sexta-feira, 7 de março de 2014

Lady Susan

A small Austen that's about to be adapted to a movie. Very confusing, actually. The movie will tell Lady Susan 's story BUT will have another Austen's story title: 'Love and Friendship '.

Anyway, here's what Wikipedia has to say: Austen's "most wicked tale" Lady Susan is a short epistolary² novel by Jane Austen, possibly written in 1794 but not published until 1871. Lady Susan is a selfish, attractive woman, who tries to trap the best possible husband while maintaining a relationship with a married man. She subverts all the standards of the romantic novel; she has an active role, she's not only beautiful but intelligent and witty, and her suitors are significantly younger³ than she is.


I comment:
¹- Austen + wicked : Only this would make me run to read it!
²- Epistolary: Mmmm... that could be tricky. My next Darcy&Lizzy has some letters but I don't believe I could pull a 84 Charing Cross Road ...
³- A sassy woman who can play with silly men... Yummy.

I've played with all these contents on my first authoral novel and I loved it.

But now, let's read Austen wickedness...


hot rio chick sassy woman



Jane Austen


page 40

Letter XV
MRS. VERNON TO LADY DE COURCY


           Mr. Vernon declares that he never saw deeper distress than hers, on the receipt of the letter; and is his judgment inferior to mine? She was very unwilling that Frederica should be allowed to come to Churchhill, and justly enough, as it seems a sort of reward to behaviour deserving very differently; but it was impossible to take her anywhere else, and she is not to remain here long. "It will be absolutely necessary," said she, "as you, my dear sister, must be sensible, to treat my daughter with some severity while she is here; a most painful necessity, but I will ENDEAVOUR to submit to it. I am afraid I have often been too indulgent, but my poor Frederica's temper could never bear opposition well: you must support and encourage me; you must urge the necessity of reproof if you see me too lenient." All this sounds very reasonable. Reginald is so incensed against the poor silly girl. Surely it is not to Lady Susan's credit that he should be so bitter against her daughter; his idea of her must be drawn from the mother's description. Well, whatever may be his fate, we have the comfort of knowing that we have done our utmost to save him. We must commit the event to a higher power.

Yours ever, &c.,
Catherine Verno

---

Portrait of the Hon. Emily Mary Lamb

1803, Sir Thomas Lawrence



Disclaimer: 40 pages 40 is my way to come to terms with celebrate my 40th birthday. By promoting 40 awesome books I like in no way I intend to dupe the original authors. If you, as me, like what you read, buy them!
All 40 books can be found on the right side bar. ►
All images found on Google. Kudos to the original poster.